IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Reply to this topicStart new topic
The Costumes of Armenian Women
chase
post 10/08/05 12:13 PM
Post #1


Member
*******

Group: MEIC Members/Donors
Posts: 6,042
Joined: 03/22/05 02:20 PM
From: NYC, USA
Member No.: 17



IPB Image
IPB Image
Queen Satenik (Wife of Artashes I
The Artashesian Dynasty, 190 B.C.

IPB Image
Aristocratic Lady (4th - 5th century A.D.
IPB Image
Princess Keran
The Cilician Dynasty 13th century A.D.

IPB Image
Costume from New Jalfa - Isfahan (16th - 17th c
Made of antique cloth embroidered entirely by hand

IPB Image
Nun of New Jalfa - Isfahan (17th c.
IPB Image
Costume from the district of Chahar-Mahal
The mouth-cover is an Islamic influence

IPB Image
Gozalner (The Beauties) 19th c. - Tblisi.
Armenian ladies of high rank enjoying bardic songs and dances

IPB Image
Armenian Costume from Tbilisi, Georgia (17th c.)
IPB Image
Akhaltzkha (19th c.) - A bridal dress with
an exquisite gold embroidery on a dark red apron.

[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women23.jpg[/img]
A Costume from Zangezur (Siuniq) 18th c.
[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women25.jpg[/img]
Shamakh (19th c.) - A bridal dress
[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women28.jpg[/img]
A costume from Shatakh (Vaspurakan)
Notable features are the ornamented hat, teasels and plaits.

[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women29.jpg[/img]
A costume from Gavash (Vaspurakan)
Note the picturesque apron

[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women38.jpg[/img]
Kharberd
Rustic dress with an embroidered apron.

[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women30.jpg[/img]
Rural dress from Timar (Vaspurakan)
[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women33.jpg[/img]
Lower Hiq (19th c.) - Bridal dress.
Her "kot" is an embroidered antique. The ornaments
of the dress bear Armenian motifs.

[img]http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/large/women42.jpg[/img]
Armenian Church Constantinople (19th c.)
A deaconess serving in the Armenian Church.
She wears an orarion and fine silver-wrought veil,
in her hand she holds a flabellum.

http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/te...textile_p4.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
chase
post 10/08/05 12:21 PM
Post #2


Member
*******

Group: MEIC Members/Donors
Posts: 6,042
Joined: 03/22/05 02:20 PM
From: NYC, USA
Member No.: 17



The Costumes of Armenian Women
By "Hai Guin" Society of Tehran

Among the earliest cultural values of the Armenians was the high status of women both as productive members of the economy and as homemakers.

Formal authority rested with the men, but women developed what has been aptly described as "rule by silence." Constant struggle with outside forces who sought Armenia as a prize of conquest led to strong family bonds and the need for the most effective possible participation of women in sustaining the home:

Armenian society developed a strong tradition of respect for elders and their secure place within the family structure, along with the moral authority of women in the regulation of social and domestic behaviour. It may well be that the Armenian home in all of its social, cultural, and economic nuances has been the largest single factor in the survival of the Armenian people and their repeated cultural resurgence.

Historic Armenia has been an important bridge between the cultures and economies of East and West, while through all the millenia of cross-fertilization of ideas and skills, retaining its own traditions, sustaining a high output of its own creations, and maintaining an indomitable sense of self identity. The pride in being Armenian essential to the preservation of their self identity, is most clearly apparent in the costumes of Armenian women.

Into Armenian clothing went the skilled weaving, spinning, dyeing, cutting, fitting and needlework of Armenian women. The wool taken from the sheep grazing on the mountains, the cotton and linen from the farms in the fertile valleys. Some of the cloth, such as silk, came from China. Examples of Chinese silk, dating from 750 B.C., among the very oldest known, have been found near Van in ancient Armenia. Mulberry trees and silkworm cultivation was introduced later.

During the Arab overlordship of Armenia a major item of annual tribute was 500 lengths of highly prized Armenian striped silk. Leather tanning, the making of boots, sandals, gloves, and other items of clothing was an ancient art, including portable Armenian leather bath-tubs, highly favoured by the Emperors of Byzantium. The furs of various animals found in Armenia were used for mantles and fur trim, including the stoat, whose greatly prized winter fur is ermine, a term which derives from the word Armenia, for it was an item of trade identified with Armenian merchants offering their wares to the royal courts of Europe. And from the hills and valleys of Armenia came the herbs and animal dyestuffs, most notably an aphis that fed in the autumn on the roots of plants on Mount Ararat, which was the source of the famous Armenian crimson, a distinctive colour traded by merchants far and wide, following from Ararat the same Silk Route to Europe.

The Armenian woman and her attire were one and indivisible. Her clothing was the repository of the crafts, values, and tastes expressed in her society. There was a reciprocal influence between Armenian and other Asian as well as European clothing styles, especially in the movement of basic fashion ideas. Some social conventions in women's attire she developed on her own, some of her neighbouring origin she absorbed voluntarily, and some were the imposition of conquerors. She was expected to be modest and virtuous, her bearing and attire attesting to these qualities. The common characteristic of all Armenian costumes is the expression of modesty within the social ideal of feminine virtue.

Her attire included serious attention to the hair, which was dressed in various styles, but as an obligation allowed to grow to luxuriant length, often braided, sometimes the ends gathered in a heavy wooden comb to keep a pattern of braids in place. To cut the hair meant degradation and no punishment was stronger for a woman than to have 'her braids cut, a sign of immorality. Yet facial make-up and the use of scents were part of every woman's beauty treatment and coquetry, as were the use of jewelry and ornaments.

Through the conventions of each era and each region, her clothing was a style that expressed her own taste, the product in part or wholly of her own hands, and an extension of her sense of beauty, understanding of quality, and respect for tradition. The clothing of the Armenian woman is in a profound way an intimate history of the Armenian people.

Armenian women excelled in embroidery and the making of lace. Whereas in many nations lace and embroidery were luxuries adorning only the dresses of ladies of the court or the otherwise very wealthy, it was in Armenia part of the pride of every girl. Samples of exquisite work in silver belts, gold filagree rings, necklaces and other costume ornamentation and jewelry, are seen on most rural costumes.

From ancient Urartu down through the centuries Armenian women were masterly in the weaving of carpets and cloth, embroidery, crocheting and the making of bone lace. Lace was worn in every sector of the society virtually every day, and ornamented even simple dresses, was part of the national costume, and integral to the "kot" or headdress of Armenian women. Making lace was part of a girl's education, and often when all else was lost, property and possessions gone, the Armenian woman might thank God she still had her hands. In the thimble and needle of the woman was a skill that endured every change of season and of fortune, enabling her not only to make a living but to re-express in a continuing thread the splendour and beauty of life.

Patterns that were shaped in wood stone, stucco and bone carvings were also expressed in lace. Even patterns that once adorned ancient Urartian shields, etched into the metal, or patterns found in masterworks in silver and gold would be repeated in lace. Thus in lace, many basic designs have been preserved through generations.

Clothing must be designed for various functions and meet a variety of needs. There is the need for protection against the elements. The winters of Armenia are snow-bound and often bitterly cold. In ancient times, for four months of the year, sleds rather than wheeled vehicles were used in the Armenian uplands, while the horses wore large bags on their feet as snow-shoes. Spring and Autumn are temperate and cool, while the summers can be very hot. Thus the clothing must be adaptable to extremes of winter and summer. The more beautiful the dress, even when simple, the more it increased the self confidence of the Armenian woman. The more it exhibited her artistic skill and personal inventions with the needle, the more it asserted her taste and social outlook. It was this assertion of personal taste and social outlook which carried forward through the ages the Armenian traditions of women's attire.

Continuity of tradition was assured through the trousseau. This was an essential part of the dowery of the bride. The girl started on it early, but as the time of her marriage approached, it was usually a joint effort between generations in the same house, and sometimes between relatives and neighbours. Thus, grandmother, mother, and daughter would work on the same trousseau, sometimes calling in the outstanding needlework of a neighbour, an aunt or a cousin. The' bed spreads, pillow cases, towels, table linen, curtains, and wall hangings had to be made. In some areas the dowery might also include carpets woven by the bride. Armenian carpets were held in high repute well beyond the borders of Armenia. But of all the necessary house furnishings and clothing, the masterpiece, of course, would be the bridal dress upon which was lavished the most tender care.

A whole day was normally set aside for everyone to see the trousseau on exhibit. This was the occasion to evaluate the bride. Her beauty, her brains, her laughing eyes might be considered on some other occasion, but on this day she would have to face, for the skill of her needle, the scrutiny of the visitors. She would have to meet or excel very exacting standards while attempting to balance conformity to tradition and natural desire for personal self expression within acceptable bounds.

If the trousseau and the social conventions attached to it assured continuity of clothing styles for the women, the men, on the other hand, were freer in their choice of style of clothing. In areas where Armenians were a minority, it was often necessary for the men to adopt the prevailing style of attire. Thus, the strongly visual Armenian identity in clothing often rested squarely on the woman. Consequently, the attire of Armenian women grew to embrace the strongest values of national identity, becoming the living expression of the homeland and the continuity of Armenian culture.

The costumes of Armenian women through the ages depicted on this page were prepared by the "Hai Guin" Society of Tehran, Iran. In preparing these dresses, a careful work of research was accomplished. Documents were studied for the selection of prototypes from every era of Armenian history authenticated by scholars from various parts of the world.
http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/te...textile_p4.html
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
chase
post 10/08/05 12:25 PM
Post #3


Member
*******

Group: MEIC Members/Donors
Posts: 6,042
Joined: 03/22/05 02:20 PM
From: NYC, USA
Member No.: 17



COSTUMES - ARMENIAN FASHIONS

There is a rich tradition related to how our ancestors dressed. The Armenian clothes, costumes and styles have been complimented by a rich cultural tradition. Wool and fur were utilized by the Armenians and later cotton that was grown in the fertile valleys. Silk imported from China was used by royalty, during the Urartian period. Later the Armenians cultivated silkworms and produced their own silk.

The pride in being Armenian essential to the preservation of their self-identity was most clearly apparent in the Costumes of Armenian women. For the Armenian woman clothing was a vehicle for self-expression. A combination of factors influenced the Armenian woman's apparel: regional traditions, family methods of dressmaking, as well as her own personal esthetic taste. The natural environment also played a role. The warm clothing required because of mountain winters took the form of layers of garments common in Armenian traditional dress.

Women learned to make clothing and costumes from generation to generation. The objects a daughter produced were slowly assembled into her trousseau, an important part of a bride’s dowry. The clothing and costumes of Armenian women typically emphasized color and hand-worked ornamentation, elements which were subject to variation according to taste. Lace also adorned the costumes of Armenian woman.

Among the most popular dyes for wools, cottons, and silks was the distinctive scarlet-colored cochineal prepared from dried insects indigenous to the area of Mount Ararat. Armenians were particularly fond of velvet and silk, and were accomplished silkworm cultivators. Along with woven fabrics was the use of furs. Ermine (a word derived from Armenia) was among the most prized and was exported by Armenians in Europe.

There was a sharp contrast from women’s styles compared to men’s clothing. Men’s costumes resembled the non-Christian nationalities surrounding them. Thus, men could mingle with ease and conduct business transactions. Women, on the other hand, had few opportunities for outside contact and dressed in traditional Armenian styles to which they had become accustomed to in family life.

The history of Armenian women’s costumes begins with ancient Urartu, to Armenian costumes bearing the Persian influence. Armenian woman used their skills in weaving, spinning, dyeing, cutting, fitting and needlework. The Armenian woman and her attire were one and indivisible. Her clothing was the repository of the crafts, values, and tastes expressed in her society. There was a reciprocal influence between Armenian and other Asian as well as European clothing styles, especially in the movement of basic fashion ideas.

The costumes of Armenians depicted women from all walks of life from queens and commoners, princesses and noblewomen, urban dwellers and rustic maidens, nuns and brides, in a social, regional and historical cross-section of Armenian society through the ages.

As you research the history, the collection of Armenian women’s costumes begins during the Urartu time period, wherein dresses were designed with creamy white silk, embroidered with gold thread. The costume was a replica of a medallion unearthed by archaeologists at Toprak Kale near Lake Van, which some 3,000 years ago was the site of the capital of the Kingdom of Urarta.

By the third century B.C. Armenia had become a key power in the east, and from this period, the costume of Queen Satenik was produced. Similarly , over the centuries other costumes were produced for Armenian queens, aristocrats, nuns, citizen women, brides, with the design and color of the costumes varying based on the region where the Armenians resided.

All of these costumes expressed the splendid heritage of a living culture. These costumes are part of the on-going legacy of a proud and gifted people whose creative contributions continues to draw nourishment from a three thousand year old history.
Excerpts of Article taken from: “The Costumes of Armenian Women” and “ARMENIA Crossroads of Culture- by Anahid V. Ordjanian[color=red][/color]
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Yerevan
post 10/09/05 10:43 AM
Post #4


Member
*******

Group: MEIC Conversion Group
Posts: 1,637
Joined: 09/01/05 11:05 PM
Member No.: 165



Chase Thank You very much.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
chase
post 10/10/05 11:49 AM
Post #5


Member
*******

Group: MEIC Members/Donors
Posts: 6,042
Joined: 03/22/05 02:20 PM
From: NYC, USA
Member No.: 17



Glad you liked them yerevan. As you can see I went back in and hi-lighted the areas where BOTH books mentioned the ancient Urartu with Armenians as their descendants. As yoiu know a lot of work and research goes into writing these types of books and I believe both books got it right.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
chase
post 06/09/07 10:57 PM
Post #6


Member
*******

Group: MEIC Members/Donors
Posts: 6,042
Joined: 03/22/05 02:20 PM
From: NYC, USA
Member No.: 17




A Costume from Zangezur (Siuniq) 18th c.

Shamakh (19th c.) - A bridal dress

A costume from Shatakh (Vaspurakan)
Notable features are the ornamented hat, teasels and plaits.

A costume from Gavash (Vaspurakan)
Note the picturesque apron


Kharberd
Rustic dress with an embroidered apron.


Rural dress from Timar (Vaspurakan)

Lower Hiq (19th c.) - Bridal dress.
Her "kot" is an embroidered antique. The ornaments
of the dress bear Armenian motifs.


Armenian Church Constantinople (19th c.)
A deaconess serving in the Armenian Church.
She wears an orarion and fine silver-wrought veil,
in her hand she holds a flabellum.

http://www.hyeetch.nareg.com.au/culture/te...textile_p4.html

Stunning Armenian fashion through the ages.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
irlandahay
post 06/10/07 08:35 AM
Post #7


Member
*******

Group: MEIC Conversion Group
Posts: 1,003
Joined: 07/20/06 10:37 AM
Member No.: 707
Conflict/Cultural/Country Interest: ARMENIA!

i am half irish half armenian, ireland is free from england, but armenia has yet to be free from the clutches of turkey



Very nice Chase, thank you. icon_smile.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 04/24/14 12:24 AM