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THE DESECRATED CHURCHES of CONSTANTINOPLE (now Istanbul!)
chase
post 11/25/05 02:51 PM
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JUST A FEW OF THE DESECRATED CHURCHES OF CONSTANTINOPLE

One of the basic characteristics of any nation who wishes to be called civilized is religious freedom. A concept unknown the Turkish nation. In the occupied by the Turks Constantinople, tens of Christian churches and monasteries, real jewels of the European civilization have either been converted to mosques or demolished with frescoe's and precious artifacts stolen.

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The famous church of the Holy Apostles used today as a mosque.

On the fourth hill of the city, to the northwest of the Aqueduct of Valens, was the church of the Holy Apostles, the most famous church in Constantinople after Saint (Hagia) Sophia. The basilica of the Twelve Apostles was erected in 330 by the Roman Emperor Constantine, who built within the church a large cross-shaped tomb intended for his own burial. He also prepared twelve empty caskets that were to receive the relics of the Twelve Apostles. In 356, the Roman Emperor Constantius brought and deposited under the altar the relics of Apostles Andrew from Achaia and Luke the Evangelist and Timothy from Ephesus. In 550 the church was rebuilt by the Roman Emperor Justinian, designed with the Greek cross plan by the celebrated architects Anthemius of Tralles and Isidorus of Miletus. The church also held the relics of the great Fathers of the Church Saint John Chrysostom and Saint Gregory the Theologian, placed in caskets on either side of the altar. The "Column of Flagellation", to which Jesus Christ had been bound and flogged, was also among the relics of the church. The church's yard was the resting place of the Byzantine Emperors from Constantine and his mother Helen until the 11th century. The graves of all our Patriarchs were also in the yard.

Most of the relics, the gold and silver vessels decorated with precious stones, the icons, the imperial crowns, the magnificent hieratic vestments and other important objects of the church of the Holy Apostles were carried off to Western Europe, when our capital was looted by the Latins in 1204. The Latins plundered the imperial tombs and robbed them of gold and gems. The glorious tombs were completely destroyed in the fall of Constantinople to the Turks (29th May 1453) by fanatical dervishes of sultan Mehmet II. According to the historian Kritoboulos, the dervishes smashed for 14 hours with clubs and steel rods the lyrics. After smashing them, they threw what was left in a lime furnace. In 1461 sultan Mehmet II demolished the church and built a mosque over its foundations, the Fatih (Conqueror) mosque. It was damaged beyond repair in 1763 by a terrible earthquake (divine message?) and the present mosque was built in its place.

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Interior of the Saints Sergius and Bacchus church used today as a mosque.

The Saints Sergius and Bacchus church, a landmark in our ecclesiastical architecture, was built in 527 by the Roman Emperor Justinian, shortly before the Saint (Hagia) Sophia. The church is known to this day as the "little Hagia Sophia", because the general principles of its architecture are comparable with those of our Great Church. The columns are made of coloured marble and the interior of the church shone with its variegated marble walls and the lavishness of its golden mosaic decoration.

In 1509 sultan Bayezid II converted the church into a mosque, the Huseyin Aga mosque. The Turks destroyed the apse and whitewashed the frescoes and mosaics on the walls.

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The Constantine of Lips monastery remains in ruins today.

The Constantine of Lips monastery is a building complex composed of the church of the Theotokos Panachrantos (the Immaculate Mother of God), the church of Saint John the Baptist and the funerary chapel. The first church was built in 908 to the north of the site by Constantine Lips, a patrician of the Greek Emperor Leo VI the Wise. In the late 13th century the Greek Empress Theodora erected at the center of the complex a new church dedicated to Saint John the Baptist and at the south a small funerary chapel. Excavations unearthed 32 tombs, including those of the Empress Theodora herself and of her daughter Eudocia. The monastery was a true work of art with the alternating tripartite arched windows, the elaborate decoration of toothed bands and meanders and the interplay of red and white brick blocks.

In 1453 sultan Mehmet II converted the monastery into a mosque, the Fenari Isa mosque. The north part of the peristyle of Saint John was destroyed. The mosque suffered severe damages by fire in 1622 and 1917. After the first fire the Turks destroyed the columns. After 1917 the monastery remains in ruins.

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The Myrelaion monastery used today as a mosque.

The Myrelaion (Holy Anointing Oil) monastery, was built in 920 by the Greek Emperor Romanus I Lecapenus. Several members of the Macedonian and Comneni dynasties were buried in its basement crypt. The architecture of the chapel, the only surviving part of the monastery, is considered a masterpiece.

In 1574 sultan Murat III converted the monastery into a mosque, the Bodrum mosque. The mosque was destroyed by fire twice in 1784 and 1911. A fine portrait of a Byzantine princess revealed during excavations is now missing.

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The Jesus Christ Pantocrator monastery used today as a mosque.

The Jesus Christ Pantocrator monastery was built on a hill, to the right of the large avenue leading from the Golden Horn to the Aqueduct of Valens, in 1136 by the Greek Emperor John II Comnenos and designed by the architect Nikephoros. This monumental complex is the greatest church built in Constantinople after the time of Justinian I. The Greek Emperor Manuel I Comnenus brought from Ephesus the marble "Stone of Unction", on which Christ's body had been anointed before the entombment. Large crowds gathered in the monastery every day from all corners of the Greek Empire to venerate this sacred relic. In the grave chapel a number of Greek Emperors were buried including John II, Manuel I and Manuel II Palaiologos.

During the Latin occupation (1204-1261) the monastery was looted by the Venetians. The icons, sacred vessels and holy relics of the Pantocrator still shamelessly decorate the church of Saint Marco at Venice. In 1453 sultan Mehmet II converted the monastery into a mosque, the Zeyrek mosque. A huge emperial sarcophagus from green specked stone with crosses on the four sides is used as a foot-bath (!!) by the Turks entering the mosque. The rough-and-ready appearance of the church makes it seem as if the conquest of Byzantium has just happened, as if the ghosts of the monks cannot be far away.

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The Saint John Baptist monastery used today as a mosque.

The small but elegant Saint John Baptist monastery in Trullo was probably built in the 12th century. In 1520 pascha Ahmet converted the monastery into a mosque.

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The Theotocos Pammakaristos monastery used today as a mosque.

On the fifth hill of the city, overlooking the Golden Horn, is the Theotocos Pammakaristos monastery, built in 1305 by Michael Tarchaniotes Glabas, one of the best and finest works from the late Byzantine era. Many travellers and scholars who visited Constantinople described with admiration the monastery of Pammakaristos. Though severely damaged, the surviving mosaics reflect the brilliance and high quality, the remarkable style and technique, the classicizing trends, and in general the culture and spirit of the Palaeologan revival. The funerary chapel, consecrated to Jesus Christ, with its elegant proportions, the fine walling with the ornamental toothed bands, the slender shallow niches and wide blind arches pierced by double and triple lights and the two elegant domes, is one of the most important examples of ecclesiastical architecture in the 13th century.

In 1587 sultan Murat III converted the monastery into a mosque, the Fethiye (Victory) mosque. In the main chapel the Turks destroyed the apse to the east. Most of the unique and holy mosaics were whitewashed. In the funerary chapel the portraits of Tarchaniotes and his wife were destroyed.

The list with the destroyed or used as mosques churches in the occupied Constantinople is endless. Briefly, so as not to tire the reader, we mention Saint Theodoroi church (Kilise mosque), Saint Theodosia church (Gul mosque), Saint John of Studius monastery (Imrahor mosque), Jesus Christ Pantepoptes monastery (Eski Imaret religious school), Saint Irene church, Saint George of Mangana monastery, Saint Euphemia church...etc.
http://www.e-grammes.gr/2000/06/church_en.htm

These churches were consecrated thus sacred Christian sites and as such they all remain Christian despite being used as mosques.
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Persian
post 11/25/05 03:23 PM
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another of chase's hate literature against muslims.

I wonder what his view is of the "desecrated" beautiful Islamic mosques in Spain.

perhaps he views it as a liberation against muslim terrorists buildings.
This forum has become a Hate Site against muslims, by few losers.

Its also necessary to point that majority of the muslim conquorors of spain were Berbers not Arabs.
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chase
post 11/25/05 06:10 PM
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QUOTE(Persian)
another of chase's hate literature against muslims.

I wonder what his view is of the \"desecrated\" beautiful Islamic mosques in Spain.

perhaps he views it as a liberation against muslim terrorists buildings.
This forum has become a Hate Site against muslims, by few losers.

Its also necessary to point that majority of the muslim conquorors of spain were Berbers not Arabs.


So now I'm also a Muslim hater. lol You want me to start calling you a Christian hater? You post enough hate to have earned that title ten-fold! What I've posted are facts and still going on until this very day so quit with the whining.

WTF, you guys invaded Spain lest thou forgettest! icon_rolleyes.gif

QUOTE
This forum has become a Hate Site against muslims, by few losers.


So all of a sudden it's become a hate site, eh? That ain't what you said the first day you posted here in the comment section - remember or do you want me to jog your memory? icon_smile.gif
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chase
post 11/25/05 07:31 PM
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BYZANTINE MONUMENT

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HAGIA SOFIA

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Hagia Sophia — View from the East. The most remarkable feature of the church, which belongs to the transitional type of domed basilica, is the huge dome supported by four massive piers.

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Hagia Sophia — The church of Hagia Sophia had been identified with the Ecumenical Patriarchate for more than one thousand years. When speaking of the Great Church of Christ, historians refer to both Hagia Sophia and the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The magnificent monument, a landmark of human creation, has also been identified with one of the greatest epochs in the history of the human race.

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Hagia Sophia — View from the East. The most remarkable feature of the church, which belongs to the transitional type of domed basilica, is the huge dome supported by four massive piers.

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Hagia Sophia — View from the South. The thrust of the huge dome is countered by the two half-domes and the smaller domes, to the east and west, and the massive buttresses to the north and south.

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Hagia Sophia lithograph from the album by the Fossati brothers, Aya Sofia Constantinople, London 1852, pl. 25 (Athens Gennadeios Library).

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Hagia Sophia lithograph from the album by the Fossati brothers, Aya Sofia Constantinople, London 1852, (Athens Gennadeios Library).

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Hagia Sophia Interior. Four arches swing across the piers, linked by four pendentives. The apices of the arches and the pendentives support the circular base of the huge central dome.

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Hagia Sophia. The south doorway of the esonarthex. The lunette is decorated with a superb mosaic composition of the enthroned Virgin and Child flanked by Constantine the Great who presents a model of the city and Justinian who offers a model of the Church.

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Hagia Sophia. South doorway of the esonarthex. The excellent mosaic composition in the lunette showing the enthroned Virgin and Child between the Emperors Constantine the Great and Justinian must have been executed in the reign of Basil II (976-1025), who held in great admiration both these Emperors.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/215_263_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Hagia Sophia’s south gallery. Mosaic depicting the Empress Zoe (1028-1050) and her third husband, Constantine IX Monomachus (1042-1055), presenting to the enthroned Christ a bag containing gold coins and a scroll inscribed with a list of donations. The composition, along with another dedicatory mosaic panel placed next, illustrates in a most eloquent manner, the association of the Byzantine Emperors with the Great Church.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/219_267_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Detail from the mosaic panel of Christ between the Empress Zoe and the Emperor Constantine IX Monomachus. Christ is the dominant figure of the mosaic composition and His depiction on a larger scale than the other two figures is meant to stress the difference between the divine and human natures.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/217_266_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
One of two angels flanking the enthroned Virgin and Child, the only figure of Gabriel executed in splended colors against a gold background, has been partly preserved on the south side of the apse.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/221_272_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Detail of Christ from the magnificent composition of the Deesis showing Christ between the Holy Virgin and John the Baptist.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/auto_generated_images/img_45a3c00d.jpg[/img][img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/auto_generated_images/img_45a3c00e.jpg[/img]
Detail of the Deesis — The magnificent mosaic composition of the Deesis showing Christ between the Holy Virgin and St. John the Baptist. The mosaic is executed in fine tesserae of soft hues and the figures are set against a background of gold. The wistful and grave expressions reflect a profound spirituality and announce a new epoch marked by high aesthetic standards and classical trends. At the same time, they signal the general feeling of insecurity caused by the fluid state of affairs and the uncertainty of the Empire’s future.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/223_275_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Hagia Sophia — Mosaics of St. John Chrysostom and St. Ignatius of Antioch. Two of the 14 bishops and 16 prophets portrayed in the blind arches above the galleries of the north and south sides. A third surviving figure is that of the Patriarch Ignatius the Younger, the well-known opponent of the Patriarch Photios I. Portrayals of Patriarchs are not uncommon in the decoration of churches and other public buildings.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/Justinian_142.jpg[/img]
Hagia Sophia. Detail of the mosaic in the lunette over the south doorway showing Justinian who presents a model of the church of Hagia Sophia to the Virgin and Child.

When studying the history of Constantinople through the descriptions contained in the writings of chronographers, historians and travellers, and even in patristic works and legendaries, one is impressed by the great number of churches mentioned therein. Indeed, this is quite indicative of the deep religious faith of the city's inhabitants, the close relation of public and prIvate life with the ecclesiastical traditions and institutions, and the rallying of the "Christian congregation" round the Great Church and the Archbishop of Constantinople.

The Byzantine Empire lasted 1100 years and in this period we find mention of more than 450 churches -- a most appreciable number. Most of these churches were restored or remodelled in various epochs, a few continued to be used by the faithful even after the Conquest, while to this day many form the main body or part of Moslem places of worship. Some of the churches are known only from the writings of one or more travellers, and quite often it has not been possible to ascertain the exact location of the monument. On the other hand, a few forgotten churches, resisting the passage of time and human "renovations", are still displaying the sad sight of their silent ruins.

Of the sixty extant Orthodox parish churches in use today in and around Istanbul, many have a long history as they stand on the site or over the foundations of earlier churches and monasteries. The Hagia Sophia and the Hagia Eirene are unique instances of survival through the centuries. Despite the shattering and violent events that have occurred in the course of many centuries, they stand almost intact. Defying the ravages of time and the worldwide historical changes.

In addition to the churches, most of the monasteries that have been studied so far are located within the city. To this day they have preserved some characteristic feature, for example the katholikon or some other architectural section of the monastic compound, which is now part of a shrine or has been incorporated into a later building complex. These monasteries formed an integral part of Byzantine Constantinople and participated actively in the religious, political and social domain.

Monasteries were centers not only of religious practice but also of learning. Those most renowned had important libraries and, often, scriptoria for the copying of manuscripts. Modern historical and archaeological research has confirmed the existence of more than 340 monasteries within the walls of Constantinople in Byzantine times. To understand fully the density of Christian monuments, this amazingly large number of monasteries should be added to the 450 churches. The view filled travellers with a feeling of awe. This may also explain why monks and churchmen strove to make known to the faithful the "special feature" of their particular shrine. This could well be the imposing architectural appearance of the building or its splendid interior decoration, the possession of a miracle-working icon, the healing powers of a fountain of holy water, or even the venerated relics of Apostles and Saints.


The church of Hagia Sophia, associated with one of the greatest creative ages of man, had also been identified with the Ecumenical Patriarchate for more than one thousand years.

Originally known as the Great Church, because of its large size in comparison with the other churches of the Capital, it was later given the name of Hagia Sophia, the Holy Wisdom of the Logos, i.e. of Christ, the second hypostasis of the Holy Trinity. The ecclesiastical historian Socrates writes epigrammatically: Emperor Constantius <<built the Great Church, now called Sophia>>. Since the church was dedicated to Christ, Christmas was a day of special celebrations. With the passing of centuries, the designation Great Church acquired a wider spiritual significance: it included the entire Orthodox Church and was identified with the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople, which is titled <<the Great Church of Christ>>.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/199_244_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Hagia Sophia — (drawn by Giroux after A. Grabar and R. L. Van Nice).
Only scant information is available on this first, timber-roofed, Hagia Sophia. The historian Socrates, writing in 440 his ecclesiastical history of the years 305 to 439, attributes the completion of the church in 360 to Constantius II (337-361), son of Constantine the Great. The passage reads: <<..... at that time the king was building the Great Church, the one now called Sophia, adjoining it to that named Eirene. ..>>. The proximity and relation of the two churches is obvious. The consecration ceremony was conducted by the Patriarch Eudoxius (360-370), in 360.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/201_246_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Hagia Sophia isometric elevation (after Rowland J. Mainstone).

The Second Ecumenical Council was convened in Hagia Sophia in 381, during the reign of Theodosius I (378-395). Some twenty years later, on 20 June 404, the people angered by the banishment of John Chrysostom burned down the church .

Rebuilt by Theodosius 11 (408-450) and consecrated in 415, the church was again burnt to the ground by the rioting crowds during the Nika Revolt (15 January 532).

After the repression of the frightful revolt, Justinian conceived the grandiose project of rebuilding the Great Church from its foundations. This time it was to be built on plans well in advance of the times, using new daring vaulting techniques and statics. The men for the task were available. The mathematician Anthemius of Tralles and the architect Isidorus of Miletus worked with imagination and scientific accuracy to create a new design and build a masterpiece that stands unique throughout the centuries. Nothing like it was ever built before or after.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/201_247_1_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Hagia Sophia cross section. (Drawing by Giroux after A. Grabar).

Hagia Sophia — The church of Hagia Sophia had been identified with the Ecumenical Patriarchate for more than one thousand years. When speaking of the Great Church of Christ, historians refer to both Hagia Sophia and the Ecumenical Patriarchate. The magnificent monument, a landmark of human creation, has also been identified with one of the greatest epochs in the history of the human race.

[img]http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_patriarchate/chapter_4/assets/images/201_247_2_hagiasophia.jpg[/img]
Hagia Sophia Longitudinal section (Drawing by Giroux after A. Grabar0.

Anthemius and Isidorus had at their disposal a very large number of specialized craftsmen: technicians, masons, marble-carvers and many others. They were given a wide choice of building materials. The marble workshops of the empire, those of the Proconnesian islands, of Athens, Paros and Thessaly, furnished a variety of colored marble. Marble members from ancient sanctuaries (Delphi, Rome, Ephesus, Egypt) were skillfully re-used in the new edifice. Construction works lasted five years (532 537) and on 27 December 537, Patriarch Menas (536-552) consecrated the magnificent church. Some scholars maintain that construction was completed in 20 years, that thousands of crafts men were employed and that the church was consecrated in 552, in the patriarchy of Eutychius (552-565).

Hagia Sophia belongs to the transitional type of the domed basilica. Its most remarkable feature is the huge dome supported by four massive piers, each measuring approximately 100 sq. m. at the base. Four arches swing across, linked by four pendentives. The apices of the arches and the pendentives support the circular base from which rises the main dome, pierced by forty single-arched windows. Beams of light stream through the windows and illuminate the interior, decomposing the masses and creating an impression of infinite space.

Twelve large windows in two rows, seven in the lower and five in the upper, pierce the tympana of the north and south arches above the arched colonnades of the aisles and galleries. The thrust of the dome is countered by the two half-domes opening east and west, the smaller conchs of the bays at the four corners of the nave, and the massive outside buttresses to the north and south.

The esonarthex and exonarthex, to the west, are both roofed by cross-vaults. Two roofed cochliae (inclined ramps). north and south of the esonarthex Iead up to the galleries. The vast rectangular atrium extending west of the exonarthex had a peristyle along its four sides.

At the center stood the phiale (fountain of purifications) with the well-known inscription that could be read from left to right and from right to left:

NIYONANOMHMATAMHMONANOYIN

”Cleanse our sins, not only our face”

The church measures 77 x 72 m. and the impressive huge dome soaring 62 m. above the floor has a diameter of about 33 m. According to R. van Nice, a scholar well versed in the problems posed by the architecture and statics of Hagia Sophia, the nave is 38.07 m. wide, slightly more than twice the width of the aisles, which measure 18.29 m. each. The vertical planes formed between the two north and the two south piers by the arcades of the aisles and galleries and the tympana above them are aligned flush with the side of the piers facing the nave. Thus, the mass of the piers is pushed aside into the aisles and galleries. By this clever arrangement the bearing structure is hidden from the eye, creating the impression that space expands in all directions and that the dome floats in the air.

The vast expanse under the dome and the half-domes seems to expand further: <<The eye follows the vertical axis, rising into the immensity of the main dome, and moves longitudinally until it encounters the apse of the sanctuary>>(Mavridis). The capitals bearing Justinian's monogram are exquisitely carved producing a lacework effect. The marble revetments of the piers and walls glow with the beauty of their rare coloring. The imposing bronze doors are adorned with the monograms of Theophilus and Michael among inscribed prayers. Everything creates an impression of preciousness and perfect harmony. The few but so important surviving mosaics disclose the awe and diffidence of each epoch that did not dare or could not proceed to decorate the church with an iconographic programm worthy of the monument's fame.

By the end of the 5th century the basilical type of church had spread over the entire Mediterranean region with the exception of a few centralized buildings. From the early 6th century, however, the Christian world was preparing the ground for a major change in art and particularly in architecture. New methods of vaulting and statics were tried. Barrel-vaults. half-domes and domes prevailed in building techniques. The one great problem which found its solution in the age of Justinian was the transition from the square to the circle. i.e. the raising of a circular dome over a square base.

This new technical achievement, tried first in the church of St. George at Ezra. Syria, then in that of the Sts. Sergius and Bacchus at Constantinople, found its most perfect expression in the Hagia Sophia, this masterpiece of Christian architecture. Innumerable descriptions praise the classical merit of the monument. <<The spiritual character of Byzantine art found its completion in the Hagia Sophia>>, (Kalokyris). Polychrome marbles, elegant columns and fine wall revetments, gold vessels and ornaments, exquisite mosaics, the huge dome, half-domes, vaults and arches, the elaborately carved capitals, friezes and cornices, the arcades, the one hundred windows and the interplay of light and shade, all dissolve substance, filling the faithful with awe and delight and revealing to the beholder the everlasting beauty of perfection.

Some twenty years after the consecration of the church, a severe earthquake caused serious damages to the dome and the eastern half-dome. During repairs these structures partly collapsed, destroying the Lord's Table, the ciborium and the ambo (May 7, 558). Reconstruction was entrusted to Isidorus the Younger. The dome was rebuilt steeper and of lighter materials and the supporting base was reinforced. The church was re-dedicated on December 23, 563.

From time to time the Emperors repaired, restored and embellished the Great Church, or made generous donations, as it appears in the following list: Justin II (565-578) and empress Sophia, donations; Maurice (582-602) donations, in particular a gold crown; Michael I Rangabe (811-813) donations; Basil I (867-886) repairs and possible the mosaic of the Theotokos in the sanctuary apse; John I Tsimisces (969-976) donations; Basil II (976-1025) repairs to the dome and eastern apse that had been damaged by earthquakes in 989; Romanus III Argyrus (1028-1034) decoration of the capitals with gold and silver; Constantine IX Monomachus (1042-1055) and John II Comnenus (1118-1143) donations of money and properties. Patriarch George II Xiphilinus (1192-1199) is reported to have restored the interior decoration: <<He embellished anew and adorned the great church restoring all the icons of the saints that are in it>> (Chronicle of George the Sinner, Migne, Vol. 110, 1237). The buttresses at the east wall were erected in the reign of Andronicus II Palaeologus (1282-1328).

Continued here: http://www.patriarchate.org/ecumenical_pat...ia__page_1.html
Video viewing here: www.patriarchate.org/HAGIA_SOPHIA/Video_Gallery
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chase
post 11/25/05 07:36 PM
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Today this historical and magnificent tribute to God, Hagia Sofia, is being used as a library. icon_sad.gif
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Iranian
post 01/14/06 08:58 PM
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Its pretty pointless to have so many empty churches that would cost extremely high sums of money to just to maintain. The churches are taking up land in a densely populated area were the vast vast majority of the population wants mosques not churches, the people were only given what they wanted.

BTW - Hagia Sofia is a Museum.
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chase
post 01/23/06 09:10 PM
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QUOTE(Iranian)
Its pretty pointless to have so many empty churches that would cost extremely high sums of money to just to maintain. The churches are taking up land in a densely populated area were the vast vast majority of the population wants mosques not churches, the people were only given what they wanted.

BTW - Hagia Sofia is a Museum.


Do the right thing, show respect and preserve the country's heritage or do the wrong thing and demolish it.

You will lose in the end if you choose the latter in more ways than one. Think about it.

Today they're running around trying to salvage what's left from years of pure neglect. They're not doing a very good job at the restoration but at least they've realized how stupid they were and are at least trying. It took them a while though for the penny to drop. Do you know why? Think about it.

And it's got nothing to do with the EU or the UN for that matter.

In ones greed, the present is all they see - they forget about the bigger picture - the future!
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Mordoth
post 01/29/06 11:04 AM
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We are so sad 'cuz we can't pray in Mosque o' Ayasofya icon_sad.gif It is now museum , WHAT do you want more ?
If they were not converted to mosques , i claim none would be a volunteer or pioneer to restore those buildings. We protected there and restored every piece o' it .
What have you done corresponding to this ? You still use the historical mosques o' Turk Pashas as porn cinemas !!! What a disgrace !!!
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chase
post 02/27/06 11:03 PM
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[quote="Mordoth"]We are so sad 'cuz we can't pray in Mosque o' Ayasofya icon_sad.gif It is now museum , WHAT do you want more ?
If they were not converted to mosques , i claim none would be a volunteer or pioneer to restore those buildings. We protected there and restored every piece o' it .
What have you done corresponding to this ? You still use the historical mosques o' Turk Pashas as porn cinemas !!! What a disgrace !!![/quote]

There's a picture of ONE mosque posted here with a sign that made it look like it was some kind of cinema, so please don't exaggerate. If the sign wasn't photo-shopped and it was the real deal then I condemn it but I have my doubts as I've discovered it's origin in one turkish site and then it got propagated to other turkish sites and I see these seeds are being laid here as well.
IPB Image
This picture is only one of hundreds of churches that was totally destroyed and looted. Some of them were used as a bathroom and as a place of murder. There's many more posted here and I can get you lots and lots more so please do not piss on my leg and tell me it's raining!
http://middleeastinfo.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7543
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kurdistani
post 03/13/06 01:13 AM
Post #10


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QUOTE(chase)

WTF, you guys invaded Spain lest thou forgettest! icon_rolleyes.gif


Well everyone invaded everywhere at some point! icon_lol.gif
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